The Wheel of the Year

Wheel of the Year
The Wheel of the Year in the Bhakti-Wiccan Tradition

The Bhakti Wiccan tradition follows an 8-Sabbat Wheel of the Year, using Celtic names for the Quarters and Cross-Quarters of the Sabbats. The cycle accommodates a festival observance for each solstice, equinox, and cross-quarter day and suggests themes as a focus for full moon observances and other meetings in preparation for the next Sabbat.

The Wheel turns, never ending.  After the quiet period following the new year’s beginning at Samhain, the ritual cycle opens on the longest night, deep in the Mystery of Creation.

Yule

The longest night leads us to the Mystery of Birth and celebration of new life.

from Yule to Imbolc

The coldest time is for exploring within, deep learning and questioning; for grounding and centering, preparing to emerge with the first hints of Spring.

Imbolc

The appearance of new life leads us to the Mystery of Emergence and rites of venturing forth.

from Imbolc to Ostara

Early Spring is a season for exploring the world around us, inner and outer, for noticing and mindfulness, in preparation for living.

Ostara

As the days grow rapidly and we are balanced between Winter and Summer, we are called to the Mystery of Living, bathed in the magic of empowerment, and challenged by rites of commitment

from Ostara to Beltaine

Celebrating Life, we explore our communities and connections, engaging, growing, and defining, preparing for new joining and new combinations.

Beltaine

On the edge of Summer, in the richness of growth, we face the Mystery of Joining, cherishing our differences and the joy of creating new combinations.

from Beltaine to Litha

With the abundance of the the growing season, we nurture our creative combinations, build relationships, and cultivate our capabilities of giving and accepting.

Litha

On the longest day, in the midst of abundance, we seek the Mystery of Sharing and celebrate growth, community, and connections.

from Litha to Lammas

Nurturing our creations and tending to growth, we open ourselves to recognizing needs unfilled and challenges arising, preparing for the sacrifice that may be necessary to sustain abundant Life.

Lammas or Lughnasa

At the time of first harvest, in the midst of plenty, we look forward to the challenges to come and face the Mystery of Sacrifice, knowing that not all that we have nurtured can continue and part of our abundance must nourish the new life to come.

from Lammas to Mabon

As the days grow shorter, we turn our attention to discerning the true needs and acting upon them, preparing for the time of ending.

Mabon

Balanced between Summer and Winter, with the days rapidly becoming shorter, we turn to the Mystery of Ending, harvesting our gains and clearing away that which no longer serves its purpose.

from Mabon to Samhain

As the air grows colder and the nights longer, we finish and complete our work, connecting loose ends, handing off unfinished work, remembering, and embracing, as we prepare to approach the Veil.

Samhain

On the night when the Veil between the worlds is thinnest, we approach the the Veil and hope, through its Mystery, to share a moment outside of time and space with our Beloved Dead who have Crossed to whatever lies Beyond.

from Samhain to Yule

In the quiet time while the world grows dark, we cherish, thank, forgive, love, and bid farewell to all that was and will not be, preparing for rebirth.

 

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