Your Body as Your Working Tool

We, the living children of Earth and starry Heaven, are composed of body, mind, and spirit. While we speak of three named components, those are so tightly interdependent as to be inseparable this side of the Veil.

In this excerpt from Israel Regardie, The One Year Manual: Twelve Steps to Spiritual Enlightenment, we are led to explore spiritual growth through mindful practices of body relaxation and breathing, with thanks to the Servants of the Light mystery school for bringing it to our attention.

“ONE OF THE MAJOR GOALS of any system of self-development or spiritual growth is the acquisition of sensitivity or self-awareness. There is only one way of acquiring this awareness — and this is to become aware.

Sitting comfortably in a straight-backed chair, or lying flat on one’s back in bed, one merely attempts to observe what is happening, as it were, “under the skin.” You simply watch your body, its sensations and feeling here and now.

This only — and nothing more. Do not try to relax or to breathe in any unusual or special way, or to try to control the thoughts that float through the mind. All these processes and methods will be dealt with later.

For the time being, merely become conscious of any sensation that arises anywhere in the body. I suggest you wriggle around for a moment or two to find that one position which seems most comfortable. Having found it, stay in it, and do not move from it in any way.

There should be absolutely no voluntary muscular movement for the rest of the practice session. Not even a wriggle of a toe, or a wiggle of a finger.

The session should last not more than ten minutes at first, but gradually by the end of a month should be extended to half an hour. For many people this will seem an eternity in which every instinct will cry aloud for a wiggle of some kind to ease the tension. This should be resisted. Other students will find the ten minutes to pass, as it were, in a flash.

worldview by Khalila RedBird

Each individual maintains and acts on the basis of a deep and personal understanding of how the Universe works, how life unfolds, and his/her role in it. This worldview, as used here, is the ordered and integrated total of all that the individual has learned or imagined to the present moment. The worldview carries the standards and the methods by which the individual examines all new perceptions and experiences – all new information – weighs them against all prior understandings, assigns meaning to them, and decides whether or not to allow them to be integrated into the total. It includes memory and also the linkages among memories and reflections on memories. The worldview is the totality of the unique and fluid configuration of thoughts, beliefs, memories, processes, perceptions, and awareness in each moment, roughly analogous to Carl Jung’s psyche: a combination of spirit, soul, and idea, conscious and unconscious.

From “… and prate about an Elephant …”

On the Disambiguation of Religion:  Identifying its attributes for empirical investigation

by Rev. Sandra Lee Harris (Khalila RedBird HPs)

8 December 2011

on Religion — Bishop Desmond Tutu:

“And you have to remember that religion is of itself neither good nor bad. Christianity has produced the Ku Klux Klan. Christianity has produced those who killed doctors that perform abortions. Religion is a morally neutral thing. It is what you do with it. It is like a knife, a knife is good when you use it for cutting up bread for sandwiches. A knife is bad when you stick it in somebody’s gut. Religion is good when it produces a Dalai Lama, a Mother Teresa, a Martin Luther King.”         — Bishop Desmond Tutu